AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

avocastreet.com - asmc.net.au - randwickhealth.com - randwickgp.com - familydoctor.sydney
Doctors' Roster
AngelaPriscillaKienMandy
Mon8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00  10:00 - 16:00
Tue8:00 - 12:00 14:00 - 18:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Wed8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Thu8:00 - 12:00  07:30 - 14:00 10:00 - 16:00
Fri8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  

SURGERY HOURS
MON - FRI7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
SATsee notes
SUN & PUBLIC HOLIDAYSCLOSED

Sorry. We are CLOSED

For services after hours please call 13 74 25


FLU SHOTS

available NOW!


Avoca St Medical Centre has applied to be a part of the COVID vaccine rollout. However the government has not yet extended the rollout to other practices or given a date when this is expected to be. Given this delay, we would advise patients to seek alternative locations to access the COVID vaccine, eg:

Spring Street GP (Bondi)

Vaccine Eligibility Checker


Please talk to your doctor if you have any questions or need advice. Apologies for the inconvenience.
Dr Priscilla will be on duty on
1st, 3rd and 5th Saturdays of each month.

General Information
 

Rabies



Rabies is a vaccine-preventable viral disease which occurs in more than 150 countries and territories. Dogs are the source of the vast majority of human rabies deaths, contributing up to 99% of all rabies transmissions to humans. Rabies elimination is feasible by vaccinating dogs.




Infection causes tens of thousands of deaths every year, mostly in Asia and Africa. 40% of people who are bitten by suspect rabid animals are children under 15 years of age. Immediate wound cleansing with soap and water after contact with a suspect rabid animal can be life-saving. Every year, more than 15 million people worldwide receive a post-bite vaccination. This is estimated to prevent hundreds of thousands of rabies deaths annually.

Preventive immunization

The same safe and effective vaccines can be used for pre-exposure immunization. This is recommended for travellers spending a lot of time outdoors, especially in rural areas, involved in activities such as bicycling, camping, or hiking as well as for long-term travellers and expatriates living in areas with a significant risk of exposure to dog bites.


Pre-exposure immunization is also recommended for people in certain high-risk occupations such as laboratory workers dealing with live rabies virus and other rabies-related viruses (lyssaviruses), and people involved in any activities that might bring them professionally or otherwise into direct contact with bats, carnivores, and other mammals in rabies-affected areas. As children are considered at higher risk because they tend to play with animals, may receive more severe bites, or may not report bites, their immunization could be considered if living in or visiting high-risk areas.

WHO information page

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

Covid-19 Notices
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After Hours 13 74 25
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General Information
 

Immunisation and Health Check




No Jab, No Pay – Immunisation Requirements

To meet immunisation requirements and be eligible for their full rate of Family Tax Benefit (FTB) Part A, children need to be immunised in accordance with the National Immunisation Program early childhood vaccination schedule, on an approved catch-up schedule or have an approved exemption.

From 1 July 2018, families with children who are not immunised according to the early childhood vaccination schedule appropriate for the child’s age (and do not have an approved exemption) will have a reduction applied to their FTB Part A child rate for each child who does not meet the immunisation requirements.

Vaccine objection (previously known as conscientious objection) is no longer an exemption category. Families with children aged over 12 months who do not have an approved exemption — for example a medical exemption (medical contraindication or natural immunity certified by a recognised immunisation provider) or, in very limited circumstances, a Secretary’s exemption — are not eligible to receive their full entitlement to FTB Part A for that child.

For further information visit the Department of Human Services website.

Healthy Start for School - Health Check Requirement

In addition to the immunisation requirements, if an individual receives FTB Part A and the individual or their partner is receiving an income support payment during the income year that their child turns four, they need to make sure their child gets a health check before the child’s fifth birthday.

State and Territory based health assessments or a general health check provided by a local GP are acceptable health checks. For example, an individual may meet the requirements of this initiative if they have completed the three year old check outlined in their child’s personal health record book.

From 1 July 2018, a reduction will be applied to an individual’s FTB Part A child rate from the child’s fifth birthday if the health check requirement is not met, or if the individual does not notify the Department of Human Services that a health check has been completed, by the child’s fifth birthday. The reduction will apply for the corresponding number of days that the individual or their partner received FTB Part A and an income support payment during the income year that the child turned four.

For more information visit the Department of Human Services website.

For people who do not speak English, please call the Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) on 131 450. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and is accessible from anywhere in Australia for the cost of a local call.

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

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