AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
 
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

avocastreet.com - asmc.net.au - randwickhealth.com - randwickgp.com - familydoctor.sydney

General Practitioners

Dr. Mandy Chuang

M.B.B.S, B.Sc., Dip (Paeds), FRACGP.
University of NSW
Interests: Childrens & Womens health
Languages: Mandarin Chinese

Rostered hours
Mon10:00 - 16:00
Thu10:00 - 16:00

* Phone consult ONLY.


Dr. Angela
Georgopoulos

Dr. Kien
Cao-Xuan

Dr. Priscilla
Wong

Request An Appointment Online

Doctors' Roster
AngelaPriscillaKienMandy
Mon8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00  10:00 - 16:00
Tue8:00 - 12:00 13:00 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Wed8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Thu8:00 - 12:00  07:30 - 14:00 10:00 - 16:00
Fri8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  

TELEHEALTH

During this evolving COVID-19 period, Avoca Street Medical Centre advises all patients to self-isolate as much as possible. In particular we wish to protect the community's most vulnerable patients. We now offer bulk billed telephone consultations for all Medicare eligible patients whom have been seen at this practice in the past 4 years.

For patients who do not hold a valid Medicare card but have been seen at our practice in the past 4 years a pre-paid administration fee of $40 per 10 minute consultation will apply.

Avoca Street Medical Centre is currently unable to accept new patients.
We apologise for any inconvenience.

Please make a telephone appointment by:

  1. Calling 02 93993335
  2. Requesting a telephone appointment on a specific day with your preferred doctor
  3. Please leave the telephone number where you can be reached
Please allow a leeway of 2 hours from the time of your appointment. If matter is urgent or might require a face to face consult, please let staff know and doctor will call you back in between patients on the same day.

NOTE:

  • Please organise your own collection of prescriptions and referrals from reception desk between 8am - 1pm daily
  • Appointments are timed to 10 minutes - if a longer appointment is required, the doctor will rebook this for another date
  • Some items cannot be completed via telehealth and require a face to face consult. These include vaccinations, ear checks, blood pressure checks, and where specific examination of the patient is required. The doctor may rebook a face to face consult after an initial telephone consultation
  • Please respect that this is a limited service which many patients require, and be readily contactable on the day of your appointment.
  • Due to the nature of telephone consultations, we are unable to undertake chronic care for patients who do not regularly attend our practice. Please contact your usual provider.
  • Please check our COVID-19 PRACTICE UPDATES frequently.

General Information
 

Altitude Sickness



Altitude sickness, also known as mountain sickness, is caused by the low oxygen levels in the air at altitudes above about 2,500 metres. It occurs when the body has not had time to adjust to less oxygen.

Altitude sickness can affect anybody - being young or physically fit does not decrease the risk. Whether or not you get altitude sickness could depend on:
  • your height above sea level
  • the time you took to make the ascent
  • whether or not you have any problems affecting you heart and lungs.


Altitude sickness can be fatal if not treated.

What are the symptoms of altitude sickness?

If you have altitude sickness, you are likely to feel dizzy and weak, you might also have a headache and feel nauseous. It can feel like a hangover.

Altitude sickness can affect your lungs, in which case it is sometimes known as high altitude pulmonary edema or HAPE. People with HAPE can feel short of breath and have a cough and a racing heart. In extreme cases, their lips turn blue.

Altitude sickness can also cause your brain to swell with fluid, which is sometimes known as high altitude cerebral edema or HACE. People with HACE can feel confused and irritable and behave in an erratic way.

Altitude sickness can be worse at night and can last for days, even if you stay at the same altitude.

How is altitude sickness treated?

If you have altitude sickness, you should stay at the same altitude or go lower until the symptoms disappear. Rest, fluids and pain killers are likely to improve the symptoms. Do not continue to climb higher.

It is best not to drink alcohol or take sedatives or sleeping pills because they interfere with the body's adaptation to high altitude.

If you have signs of altitude sickness affecting their lungs or their brain, this is a medical emergency. You need help to descend as soon as possible. Breathing oxygen from a tank can help.

How is altitude sickness prevented?

If you're planning to travel to a high altitude, consider talking to your doctor about drugs that can help with acclimatisation, particularly if you have had altitude sickness before.

Studies have shown that prophylactic administration of acetazolamide at a dose of 250mg every eight to twelve hours before and during rapid ascent to altitude results in fewer and/or less severe symptoms (such as headache, nausea, shortness of breath, dizziness, drowsiness, and fatigue) of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Pulmonary function is greater both in subjects with mild AMS and asymptomatic subjects. The treated climbers also had less difficulty in sleeping.


You can reduce the chance of getting altitude sickness by:
  • avoiding a rapid ascent from sea level
  • don't go above about 2,500 metres for the first night's sleep
  • once you get above 3,000 metres, ascending by no more than 500 metres per day
  • spending the night below the day's highest altitude
  • avoiding strenuous exercise before your body has had time to adjust to the lower oxygen levels
  • avoiding alcohol at high altitude.
  • If you have a medical problem that affects your lungs, heart or circulation, you are at increased risk of getting altitude sickness.

If you are worried that you have altitude sickness call healthdirect on 1800 022 222 to speak to a registered nurse.

More from www.healthdirect.gov.au


The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.


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